instagram pinterest linkedin facebook twitter goodreads

ICEPICK

KIRKUS REVIEW

A tough Child Protective Services officer tangles with all kinds of miscreants

in his efforts to help a pair of Seminole waifs.

Florida, 1976. CPS bulldog Foggy Moscowitz (Three Shot Burst, 2017, etc.)

tells the reader right up front that Sammy "Icepick" Franks has dragged a

body out of the trunk of his Lincoln and tossed it in the bay. He also shoots

a barking dog, which is where Foggy comes in. The crime(s) are witnessed

by Little Cloud and Wonder Girl, a pair of Seminole children whose mother,

Echu Matta, has gone missing. A cleaning woman at the Benton Inn, she

hasn't come home for three nights. Battling racism from both the locals and

law enforcement fills Foggy with a brittle righteousness that imbues his punchy

first-person narrative. Along with Sharp and Duck, two hotheaded Native

Americans, he resolves to ferret out the truth. The officious manager of the

Benton offers the implausible story that a disgruntled Matta and two co-workers

simply haven't been showing up to work in protest over their discriminatory

treatment. Foggy is devastated when the dead body in the bay turns out to be that

of Pan Pan Washington, his old pal from Brooklyn. Not coincidentally, Foggy and

Pan Pan tangled with Icepick in Brooklyn way back when. The corpses pile up as

Foggy, Sharp, and Duck head to Oklahoma to untangle the twisted conspiracy

behind the killings and find the missing mom.

 

The third installment of DePoy's franchise, which finds a compelling anchor in

its sleuth, crackles with energy and a plot as twisty as a country road.