Phillip DePoy

Isle of Skye, Kinloch Lodge, researching

Welcome

"I want to tell ancient stories in a new way. As long as language has existed, we’ve told each other stories. Through every fashionable literary movement, through every historical context, before civilizations rise and after they fall, we repeat the events in different ways. A hero kills a monster. Hubris is always punished. Rage invariably destroys. Love works out. The current iteration of Oedipus is standing on a corner of 42nd Street, waiting for the light to change."

Phillip DePoy began his work as a writer in 1965 with the Actors and Writers Workshop. Ten years later he had become a published poet and acquired a masters degree in performance art. Soon thereafter he became a writer in residence for the Georgia Council for the Arts and a nationally reviewed performance artist. In the 1980s he was the composer in residence for the Academy Theatre. In the 1990s he was the Artistic Director of Theatrical Outfit, a professional, Equity theatre. Since then he has served as the director of several university theatre programs. 

He has also seen five of his Flap Tucker mysteries published at Dell (one was a Shamus finalist), seven Fever Devilin novels and a stand alone called THE KING JAMES CONSPIRACY from St. Martin's, and a very nice work of non-fiction called THE TAO AND THE BARD from the Arcade house. There have also been forty-two productions of plays he's written, including the Edgar Award winning EASY, best mystery play of 2002. He was also GACS 2012 Author of the Year.

MOST RECENT WORK

play
a new play at the ALLIANCE THEATRE, a twisted version of Oedipus set in Depression Era Appalachia
novel series
Christopher Marlowe, playwright, poet, rake--and on secret service to Queen Elizabeth, working to save her life.
fiction
A short story in the new Bouchercon Anthology, MURDER AT THE BEACH!
Fiction
Seventh in the Fever Devilin series, this one takes on the Tristan/Isolde mythology.
Sixth in the Fever Devilin series, Fever dies on the first page.
New Nonfiction
A conversation between Shakespeare and Lao Tzu in their own words.

Quick Links

Find Authors